Network Events


CIMVHR Forum 2019
Oct
21
to Oct 23

CIMVHR Forum 2019

With 71,500 Regular Force members in the Canadian Armed Forces, 30,000 Reserve Force members, 60,600 military families and 649,300 Veterans, we have a significant population with unique risks, exposures and experiences that demands new standards of protection, prevention and care for the ill and injured.

Each year, CIMVHR works to engage existing academic research resources, facilitate new research, increase research capacity and foster knowledge translation.

This work is showcased each year, when thought leaders from the government, academia, industry and philanthropic sectors gather at our Forum to present new research, exchange ideas, share insight, learn and collaborate.

CIMVHR: Serving those who serve us.

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CDSN-RCDS Workshop Series: Security Theme
Nov
22
8:00 AM08:00

CDSN-RCDS Workshop Series: Security Theme

Researching Canadian defense and security: Exploring research diversity, empirical obstacles, and communication challenges at a critical juncture for knowledge development

According to the 2014, survey of 267 professors teaching and researching in international politics (TRIP) in Canada, over 74% identify qualitative approaches as their primary methodology, followed by 11% citing policy analysis and a little over 6% favoring quantitative methods1. Formal and experimental methodologies remain rare as primary methods in the US with only around 2.5% self-identifying compared to less than 1% of Canadians; that notwithstanding among secondary methods in the US, they are declared by 15% declare compared to 5% of Canadian colleagues. Among qualitative methods employed, Canadian scholars deploy a variety of techniques though over half identified single case and two-thirds comparative case studies. Extrapolating those trends, the number of scholars practicing non-qualitative methods in the Canadian community is still 5 times smaller than the equivalent minority community using primarily quantitative methods in the U.S. and there are less than three dozen scholars in Canada using formal or experimental modeling examining international politics.

Year 1 (2019): Exploring methodological diversity in the study of defense and security in Canada

Canada faces a methodological diversity challenge producing knowledge using non-qualitative methods. This conference aims to tackle the diversity challenge directly by presenting a cutting-edge program including both established and emerging scholars to offer presentations on various contemporary methods. The CDSN’s mandate is to ensure diversity and inclusion regarding opportunities and outputs of defense and security research in Canada. Its member’s are dedicated to evidence-based policy analysis employing a diversity of methodological techniques and a plurality of theoretical approaches.

We invite interested scholars, practitioners and students of international relations, Canadian defense and security studies, political science, and related fields of study to join us on November 22, 2019 at Université Laval in Quebec City.

Information : csi@eti.ulaval.ca

Registration : DefenseSecurite

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Oct
3
6:00 PM18:00

2019 Paterson Public Lecture

  • Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (CDCC) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Dr. Susan Woodward is a Professor in the PhD Program in Political Science at The Graduate Centre, City University of New York. Previously, she held appointments at the Centre for Defence Studies at King’s College at the University of London, the Brookings Institution in Washington, Yale University, Williams College, and more. In 1994, Dr. Woodward served as the Head of the Analysis and Assessment Unit in the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for UNPROFOR. Her research interests include civil war, post-conflict policies including peacekeeping, peacebuilding, and statebuilding, and international intervention. She has written three books on the subject: the Balkan Tragedy: Chaos and Dissolution after the Cold War (Washington, Bookings Press, 1995); Socialist Unemployment: The Political Economy of Yugoslavia, 1945-1990 (Princeton: Princeton University, 1995), winner of the 1996 Hewett Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies. Her most recent book, The Ideology of Failed States: Why Intervention Fails (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017) examines the origins of the concept of ‘failed states’ and how that concept influenced post-Cold War security and aid interventions.

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WIIS-Canada’s 12th Annual Workshop “Security and Power in a Tumultuous World Order”
Jun
19
to Jun 21

WIIS-Canada’s 12th Annual Workshop “Security and Power in a Tumultuous World Order”

Each year in spring, a member of WIIS-Canada hosts the Annual Workshop at a university campus. The Annual Workshop is our flagship event, bringing together students, established scholars, members of the armed forces, policy-makers and representatives of civil society. The Workshop has two main aims: to provide a platform for women’s voices in the fields of peace and security; and to mainstream gender issues and gender-based analyses within the field. A central focus each year is the implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security.

Students members of WIIS-Canada from around the country are selected to present their research in peace and security, to disseminate their findings to those already working in these fields. A major part of the program is the mentoring provided by our professional members to student participants, as well as skill building workshops and professional training.

Our Annual Workshop offers a rejoinder to typical conferences in the field that are highly gender imbalanced. While we welcome participants of any gender, this workshop emphasizes the work of women in the field of international security in an effort to challenge the male-dominated status quo.

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Kingston Conference on International Security (KCIS)
Jun
10
to Jun 12

Kingston Conference on International Security (KCIS)

The 14th annual Kingston Conference on International Security (KCIS) will take place on 10-12 June 2019, at the Holiday Inn Kingston Waterfront. This year’s theme, A Changing International Order? Implications for the Security Environment, will examine indicators of change across three regions (Indo-Pacific, Europe, and the Americas), explore trends in an attempt to predict a transforming international order, and debate the security implications associated with that change.  

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New Perspectives on Shared Security: NATO's Next 70 Years
Jun
10
9:00 AM09:00

New Perspectives on Shared Security: NATO's Next 70 Years

In conjunction with NATO’s Public Diplomacy Division

Join the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, in partnership with NATO, for a public discussion of the challenges and opportunities to the alliance’s mission for the next 70 years. As NATO celebrates seven successful decades of collective defence the alliance is looking at future trends in its strategic environment. Join some of Canada’s leading defence and security experts for a discussion of NATO’s future from a Canadian perspective.

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